Luncheon with Mike Post

Mike Post…musician, composer, arranger and producer has long been considered the most successful composer in television history.  Our September 21st luncheon program will cover Mike’s amazing life and professional accomplishments with the insight of Don Peake who has known him since he was 16.


Please join us for a
Luncheon with Mike Post!

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Moderated by Don Peake

Wednesday, Sept 21, 2016 – 11:30am

Catalina’s Bar & Grill
6725 Sunset Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90028

$30 Members & Students / $40 Non-Members


Currently being scored under Post’s direction is the long running “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.” Over the years, his musical scores have marked dozens of popular TV programs, notably “Law & Order,””Law & Order Criminal Intent,” “NYPD Blue,” “The Rockford Files,” “Magnum PI,” “Hill Street Blues,” “L.A. Law,” “The A-Team,” “Wiseguy,” “Hunter,” “The Commish,” “Quantum Leap,” “Doogie Howser MD,” “Blossom,” “Hooperman,” “The White Shadow,” “Hardcastle & McCormick,” “Byrds of Paradise,” “News Radio,” “Silk Stalkings,” and “Renegade.” Theme songs from “The Rockford Files,” “The Greatest American Hero,” “Hill Street Blues,” and “L.A. Law” all became chart topping records and landed Post four of his five Grammy Awards. In 1996 he won the Emmy for outstanding achievement in Main Title composition for the critically acclaimed “Murder One.”

Post began his study of music with piano lessons at the age of six; at fifteen he was playing club dates; he bought a piano just like his idol Ray Charles had used on stage…a brown Wurlitzer. Ironically, nearly twenty-four years after graduating from Grant High School in the S.F. Valley, Post was summoned back to campus as one of the school’s 1987 Hall of Fame inductees. His 1962 senior classmates included Mickey Dolenz of the Monkees and “Magnum PI”s Tom Selleck.

After graduating high-school, equipped with sight-reading skills and the ability to notate music, he formed a 60’s folk ensemble, The Wellingbrook Singers…and they toured the U.S.A. After the group disbanded, Post jumped into the studio for session work that included playing backup guitar for Dick and Dee Dee, Sammy Davis Jr. and Dean Martin. For over 2 years he played on all of the Sonny and Cher recordings. His twelve-string guitar graced all of their early hits including the smash “I’ve Got You Babe.” Post’s versatility as a studio musician/arranger ultimately led to his career in the booth. While working for producer Jimmy Bowen, he formed The First Edition, featuring then unknown bassist/vocalist, Kenny Rogers. Post’s debut as producer led to the group’s Top Five single, “I Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In).” Next, he served as producer/arranger for Mason Williams‘s “The Mason Williams Phonograph Album” – the LP that spawned the hit record “Classical Gas” and garnered Post his first Grammy, awarded for “Best Instrumental Arrangement.”

At 24, Post became Musical Director for “The Andy Williams Show“…the youngest musician in TV history to hold such a position. Later he returned to television as a producer for “The Mac Davis Show.” He also began designing stage shows, eventually putting together acts for artists like Dolly Parton and Ronny Milsap. Yet Post’s most visible forte would be composing dramatic music for television and film. In 1968 he met veteran arranger/trombonist Pete Carpenter. Their initial effort was for the TV show “Toma,” Stephen J. Cannell’s first series. It launched the most important musical collaboration and friendship of their lives. They followed up with “The Rockford Files” (which became a Top 10 single and landed them each a Grammy), “Baa Baa Black Sheep”, “Hunter” and “Magnum PI.” Their partnership ended late in 1987 when Carpenter died after a long illness. In 1989 Post worked with the BMI Foundation to establish a Pete Carpenter Memorial Fund to benefit young composers.

In addition to scoring, Post has continued to work as a record producer and arranger. He’s contributed arrangements to several Ray Charles LP’s, and produced, arranged and co-wrote (with Stephen Geyer) the Theme from “The Greatest American Hero” which became a #1 record for singer Joey Scarbury. In 1981, Post hit the Top 10 again with his own recording of “The Theme from ‘Hill Street Blues,'” which featured guitarist Larry Carlton.

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Don Peake – a long time friend of Mike Post – is a multi-talented musician who has worked as a guitarist, arranger, record producer, and film music composer. Starting his professional musical career as a guitarist in 1961, when he toured as lead guitarist with the Everly Brothers at the age of 21, playing in the U.S. and Europe for two years. Peake returned to L.A. to establish himself as a recording musician, and played for many of the legendary performers under Phil Spector’s production including The Righteous Brothers“You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling,” Ike and Tina Turner“River Deep Mountain High,” as well as recording with Mahalia Jackson, Billy Preston, Cannonball Adderly, Marvin Gaye, and Diana Ross.

He travelled and recorded with Ray Charles for 10 years, and became known as one of the premiere session guitarists in L.A., playing with Marvin Gaye, the Jackson Five, Smokey Robinson, John Lennon, Barry White, and more. He then added arranging to his repertoire — for Bobby Darin, Gloria Gaynor, Tavares, Jermaine Jackson, Sonny and Cher, and Wayne Newton, to name a few. He has since composed for commercials, two Academy Award winning live action short films, and films includingThe Hills Have Eyes,” “Walk Proud,” “Breakin,” and Wes Craven’s The People Under the Stairs,” plus series work such as “Knight Rider.” He was inducted into the Musician’s Hall of Fame as a member of The Wrecking Crew and recently played on the new Alicia Keys album and the “Ice Age 5” soundtrack.

Join us for a VERY entertaining day – and bring your questions!